Thats a lot of smart people in one place!

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Ads Promoting Atheism Plastered on NYC Subways

Published October 20, 2009

Associated Press

NEW YORK –  Ads promoting atheism will be going up in New York City subway stations.

The monthlong ad campaign begins next Monday in a dozen Manhattan stations.

It features the slogan, “A Million New Yorkers Are Good Without God. Are You?”

The campaign is being coordinated by the umbrella organization Coalition of Reason. It cost $25,000 and was funded by an anonymous donor.

The coalition has placed similar billboards in the Dallas area and West Virginia. Another group ran ads in Chicago and in the Indiana cities of Bloomington and South Bend.

In July, another group, New York City Atheists, ran a similar but unrelated campaign on city buses.

One estimate puts the number of New York City atheists at about one million.

From the ME zone–Counting the blase christians who actually don’t believe in any god but are the ignorant sheep of the world, I’d tally the count of non-believers at probably three times the one million. Most christians in urban areas that are middle to upper middle income would actually laugh at you if you ACTUALLY saw Jesus AND talked to him and then relayed the account to them. The number of ‘nones,’ those who have no religious affiliation is probably closer to 30-40% than 20%. It’s just going to take time for these people to stop lying to themselves!

LOST-not just a series on an island!

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Billboard Promoting Atheism Vandalized in California

Published February 18, 2010

FoxNews.com

Maybe God did it?

No one yet has claimed responsibility for the defacement of a billboard in Sacramento promoting atheism, but needless to say, the sponsors of the billboard aren’t happy.

The billboard originally read, “Are you without God? Millions are,” but someone used spray paint to add “also lost?” to the end of the message, UPI.com reported.

Rachel Harrington of the Sacramento Area Coalition of Reason, which sponsored the billboard, said the ads aim to show it’s socially acceptable to be an atheist or an agnostic.

The vandalism “shows loud and clear just how necessary our message is, because prejudice against people who don’t believe in a god remains very real in America,” she told UPI.com.

Clear Channel, which leases the billboard space, has offered to replace the sign free of charge.

From the desk of The Imperious Bleeder– Millions lost for not buying into a ridiculous myth? Yes folks, Chrazy Christians chonverts are everywhere! They are even spraying grafitti on signs! Kudos to Clear Channel for doing the right thing! Just call them Mythbusters!! 

Dana Parino’s mind is officially closed for business!!

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03:29 PM ET
 

Fox News host: Atheists ‘don’t have to live here’

By Daniel BurkeCNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN) – Fox News pundit Dana Perino said she’s “tired” of atheists attempting to remove the phrase “under God” from the Pledge of Allegiance, adding, “if these people really don’t like it, they don’t have to live here.”

The co-host of Fox’s “The Five” was referring to a suit brought by the American Humanist Association in Massachusetts, where the state’s Supreme Judicial Court heard a challenge to the pledge on Wednesday.

The group’s executive director, Roy Speckhardt, called the suit “the first challenge of its kind,” but Perino begged to differ.

Perino, who was White House press secretary for George W. Bush from 2007-2009, said she recalled working at the Justice Department in 2001 “and a lawsuit like this came through.”

The former Bush spokeswoman added that “before the day had finished the United States Senate and the House of Representatives had both passed resolutions saying that they were for keeping ‘under God’ in the pledge.”

“If these people don’t like it, they don’t have to live here,” Perino added.

David Silverman, president of the American Atheists, called Perino’s comments “bigotry.”

“I, for one, am tired of those Christians, like Ms. Perino, who think that equality is somehow un-American,” Silverman said. “If Ms. Perino doesn’t like being only equal, it is she who will have to leave America to some other country that doesn’t value religious liberty.”

READ MORE: Famous Atheists and Their Beliefs 

In 2002, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with atheist Michael Newdow who argued that the words “under God” in the pledge amounted to an unconstitutional government endorsement of religion. The Supreme Court overturned that ruling.

Congress added the words “under God” in 1954 amid the red scare over the Soviet Union. In November 2002, after the Newdow ruling, Congress passed a lawreaffirming “under God” in the pledge.

Greg Gutfeld, another co-host on “The Five,” continued the discussion after Perino, saying the Pledge of Allegiance “is not a prayer, it’s a patriotic exercise. In a sense, it’s basically saying: Thanks for giving us the freedom to be an atheist.”

The Massachusetts case, which was brought by an unidentified family of a student at a school in suburban Boston, will be argued on the premise that the pledge violates the Equal Rights Amendment of the Massachusetts Constitution.

READ MORE: Behold, the Six Types of Atheists

It is the first such case to be tried on the state level: All previous attempts have been argued in federal court on the grounds that “under God” was an unconstitutional violation of the separation of church and state.

 

Oprah proves, yet again, her blazing ignorance!

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October 16th, 2013
03:20 PM ET
 

What Oprah gets wrong about atheism


Opinion by Chris Stedmanspecial to CNN

(CNN) – To some, Oprah Winfrey appears to have an almost godlike status. Her talents are well recognized, and her endorsement can turn almost any product into an overnight bestseller.

This godlike perception is fitting, since in recent years Winfrey’s work has increasingly emphasized spirituality, including programs like her own “Super Soul Sunday.”

But what happens when an atheist enters the mix?

A few days ago Winfrey interviewed long-distance swimmer Diana Nyad on Super Soul Sunday. Nyad identified herself as an atheist who experiences awe and wonder at the natural world and humanity.

Nyad, 64, who swam from Cuba to Key West last month, said “I can stand at the beach’s edge with the most devout Christian, Jew, Buddhist, go on down the line, and weep with the beauty of this universe and be moved by all of humanity — all the billions of people who have lived before us, who have loved and hurt.”

Winfrey responded, “Well I don’t call you an atheist then.”

Winfrey went on, “I think if you believe in the awe and the wonder and the mystery then that is what God is… It’s not a bearded guy in the sky.”

Nyad clarified that she doesn’t use the word God because it implies a “presence… a creator or an overseer.”

Winfrey’s response may have been well intended, but it erased Nyad’s atheist identity and suggested something entirely untrue and, to many atheists like me, offensive: that atheists don’t experience awe and wonder.

MORE ON CNN: Diana Nyad completes historic Cuba-to-Florida swim

The exchange between Winfrey and Nyad reminds me of a conversation I once had with a Catholic scholar.

The professor once asked me: “When I talk about God, I mean love and justice and reconciliation, not a man in the sky. You talk about love and justice and reconciliation. Why can’t you just call that God?”

I replied: “Why must you call that God? Why not just call it what it is: love and justice and reconciliation?”

Though we started off with this disagreement, we came to better understand one another’s points of view through patient, honest dialogue.

Conversations like that are greatly needed today, as atheists are broadly misunderstood.

MORE ON CNN: Behold, the six types of atheists

When I visit college and university campuses around the United States, I frequently ask students what words are commonly associated with atheists. Their responses nearly always include words like “negative,” “selfish,” “nihilistic” and “closed-minded.”

When I ask how many of them actually have a relationship with an atheist, few raise their hands.

Relationships can be transformative. The Pew Research Center found that among the 14% of Americans who changed their mind from opposing same-sex marriage to supporting it in the last decade, the top reason given was having “friends, family, acquaintances who are gay/lesbian.”

Knowing someone of a different identity can increase understanding. This has been true for me as a queer person and as an atheist. I have met people who initially think I can’t actually be an atheist when they learn that I experience awe and am committed to service and social justice.

But when I explain that atheism is central to my worldview — that I am in awe of the natural world and that I believe it is up to human beings, instead of a divine force, to strive to address our problems — they often better understand my views, even if we don’t agree.

While theists can learn by listening to atheists more, atheists themselves can foster greater understanding by not just emphasizing the “no” of atheism — our disagreement over the existence of any gods — but also the “yes” of atheism and secular humanism, which recognizes the amazing potential within human beings.

Carl Sagan, the agnostic astronomer and author, would have agreed with Nyad’s claim that you can be an atheist, agnostic or nonreligious person and consider yourself “spiritual.”

As Sagan wrote in “The Demon-Haunted World,”:

“When we recognize our place in an immensity of light‐years and in the passage of ages, when we grasp the intricacy, beauty and subtlety of life, then that soaring feeling, that sense of elation and humility combined, is surely spiritual.”

Nyad told Winfrey that she feels a similar sense of awe:

“I think you can be an atheist who doesn’t believe in an overarching being who created all of this and sees over it,” she said. “But there’s spirituality because we human beings, and we animals, and maybe even we plants, but certainly the ocean and the moon and the stars, we all live with something that is cherished and we feel the treasure of it.”

MORE ON CNN:  ‘Atheist’ isn’t a dirty word, congresswoman

I experience that same awe when I see people of different beliefs coming together across lines of religious difference to recognize that we are all human — that we all love and hurt.

Perhaps Winfrey, who could use her influence to shatter stereotypes about atheists rather than reinforce them, would have benefited from listening to Nyad just a bit more closely and from talking to more atheists about awe and wonder.

I know many who would be up to the task.

Chris Stedman is the assistant humanist chaplain at Harvard University, coordinator of humanist life for the Yale Humanist Community and author of Faitheist: How an Atheist Found Common Ground with the Religious

 
   – CNN Belief Blog

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